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5 of Tennessee's most beautiful State Parks

Updated: Nov 12


David Crockett State Park - Lawrenceburg, Tennessee


David Crockett was a pioneer, soldier, politician, and industrialist. He was born near the little town of Limestone in northeast Tennessee in 1786. In 1817, he moved to Lawrence County and served as a justice of the peace, a colonel of the militia, and a state representative. Along the banks of Shoal Creek, he established a diversified industry consisting of a powdermill, a gristmill, and a distillery in what is now his namesake park. All three operations were washed away in a flood in September 1821. Financial difficulties from this loss caused Crockett to move to West Tennessee, where he was elected to Congress. While in Washington, he fought for his people’s right to keep land they had settled on in the new frontier of West Tennessee. Crockett died at the Alamo Mission in March of 1836 while aiding the Texans fighting for independence from Mexico. The 1,319-acre park has a museum staffed during the summer months, with exhibits depicting Crockett’s life here and a water-powered grist mill.

In addition to the paved bike trail, the park has more than ten miles of hiking trails. The trails offer scenic vistas of Shoal Creek and Crockett Falls, limestone bluffs, abundant wildlife, and serene forest. The Overlook Trail runs parallel to the Shoal Creek Trail.

During the summer months, swimming and boating are popular. An Olympic-sized swimming pool with a modern bathhouse and snack bar is a great way to beat the heat. There is ample sunbathing space and a wading pool for children. Lifeguards are on duty during swimming hours. Lake Lindsey is ideal for fishing and watercraft rentals. Paddleboards, canoes, kayaks, pedal boats, and fishing boats are available for rent.

David Crockett State Park has seven cabins near beautiful Lake Lindsey. Each cabin is completely furnished with two bedrooms, two baths, a full kitchen, and a covered patio. These unique modern accommodations were designed and built with energy efficiency in mind. They are Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified vacation homes. For campers, the park’s two campgrounds contain a total of 97 sites, equipped with a table, fire ring/grill combo. Camground #1 has 30-amp electrical and water hookups, and Campground #2 has 20-, 30-, 50-amp electrical and water hookups. Campground #1 also has 10 primitive campsites.

The park has an onsite restaurant that overlooks 40-acre scenic Lake Lindsey. The restaurant features excellent menu items, including local favorites. Dine-In or Take-Out is available. All you care to eat breakfast is served family-style Saturday and Sunday mornings.

Information about our annual events, including David Crockett Days (2nd weekend in August), Halloween History Trail, Winter Speaker Series, Glow in the Park 5K, and our weekly program schedules throughout the summer months, can be found online under upcoming events or by calling the park office.

Looking for a trail map? Click the link below to see a list of the maps available at this park. The page includes all the trail maps we have available, organized by park. We have free and paid options that provide you the details you need to have your next great adventure in Tennessee.

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Henry Horton State Park - Chapel Hill, Tennessee

Henry Horton State Park was constructed in the 1960s on the estate of the former governor of Tennessee, Henry Horton. The park is located on the shores of the historic Duck River, one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. Remnants of a mill and bridge operated and used by the family of Horton’s spouse for over a century may be seen today on the Wilhoite Mill Trail.

The park offers several lodging options, including a lodge, eight cabins, 56 RV campsites, 10 tent campsites, nine primitive campsites, and three backcountry campsites. There are also three group campsites available. The Restaurant and Louge at Henry Horton are a destination for travelers and locals.

The Buford Ellington championship golf course at Henry Horton State Park is a challenging course, heavily treed with hardwoods and contains 37 bunkers.

Duck River anglers can catch largemouth and smallmouth and red-eye bass and catfish, among many other species.

The Henry Horton Trap and Skeet Range includes five skeet fields, two trap fields and a lodge building with concessions. Gun rental and ammo are available. A picnic shelter is available for large shoots or related gatherings. No pullers provided. Must be 18 years of age or youth sportsman. A valid hunter education card required for shooters under the age of 18.

Henry Horton offers a versatile and varied selection of meeting spaces for events. Located near the Lodge, the conference center/recreation lodge is ideal for weddings, birthday parties, and small conferences. In addition to the conference center, there are four large rooms located at the Lodge that are suited to business presentations, corporate seminars and banquets. There are also two additional meeting rooms located in The Restaurant that are ideal for chamber breakfasts and private dining. Overhead projectors, microphones with speakers, flipcharts, easels and dry erase boards may be reserved and an LCD projector is available for daily rental. Catering is offered by The Restaurant.

PARK TRAIL MAPS Looking for a trail map? Click the link below to see a list of the maps available at this park. The page includes all the trail maps we have available, organized by park. We have free and paid options that provide you the details you need to have your next great adventure in Tennessee. VIEW MAPS

GEO-REFERENCED TRAIL MAPS Did you know that certain types of PDF maps can show your exact position on a trail? We are creating geo-referenced maps for our parks. When the map is opened with an app on your smartphone, a dot/reference point displays on the device screen at your exact location. These maps use your GPS, not your cell signal, so they work even when you do not have service. Here is what you need to access our maps: VIEW MAPS



Mousetail Landing State Park - Linden, Tennessee


This 1,247-acre area is located on the east banks of the Tennessee River. Tradition has it that Mousetail Landing received its name during the Civil War period when one of the area’s tanning companies caught fire. The exodus of mice fleeing the burning tannery was so profuse that the area in proximity of the park became known as Mousetail Landing. With Mousetail Landing State Park located on the Tennessee River, fishing is a popular activity. Fishing is permitted anywhere you can reach water. Bass, bream, crappie, stripe and catfish can be caught along the banks. Mousetail Landing has primitive campgrounds as well as sites with hookups for overnight guests.

The park has one day-use, three-mile trail. There is one overnight, eight-mile trail with two screened shelters. These back-country shelters have plywood bunks and each shelter sleeps eight people.

Mousetail Landing State Park has 25 picnic tables with grills located throughout the park. There is one large pavilion that can accommodate 100 people available for rent along with a gazebo that is a often used for weddings.

PARK TRAIL MAPS Looking for a trail map? Click the link below to see a list of the maps available at this park. The page includes all the trail maps we have available, organized by park. We have free and paid options that provide you the details you need to have your next great adventure in Tennessee. VIEW MAPS


Old Stone Fort State Archaeological Park - Manchester, Tennessee


The Old Stone Fort was built during the Middle Woodland Period, 1,500-2,000 years ago. Native Americans used this area continuously for about 500 years, eventually leaving it abandoned. By the time European settlers arrived, it was unclear of what the area had been used for which resulted in it being misnamed as a fort. In 1966, the state of Tennessee purchased 400 acres of the Chumbley estate as the core of what is now Old Stone Fort State Archaeological Park.

The park is home to an abundance of activities for guests to enjoy. The main hiking trail follows the wall of Old Stone Fort which was used by the Native Americans as a ceremonial gathering place. The trail threads through dramatic scenery where you can see the original entrance of the fort which was designed to face the exact spot on the horizon where the sun rises during the summer solstice. Visitors can learn about the Old Stone Fort on this hike with twelve interpretive panels as well as enjoying the areas graceful waterfalls. The Old Stone Fort attracts history enthusiasts from all over. The park’s museum consists of displays of prehistoric Native American replicas as well as dioramas and photos. The exhibits provide information on the theories regarding the enclosure’s builders, archaeological excavations at the site and the culture of its builders. There is also a small theater for viewing an orientation film and other videos as well as group presentations. The museum also houses the welcome center, park office and gift shop.

PARK TRAIL MAPS Looking for a trail map? Click the link below to see a list of the maps available at this park. The page includes all the trail maps we have available, organized by park. We have free and paid options that provide you the details you need to have your next great adventure in Tennessee. VIEW MAPS


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Tims Ford State Park - Winchester, Tennessee


Located on the Tims Ford Reservoir, the 3,546-acre Tims Ford State park sits in the shadows of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee. The Tims Ford Lake is considered one of the most picturesque lakes in Tennessee and is regarded as one of the top bass fishing and recreational lakes in the Southeast.

The Lake View Marina, located within the park, provides pontoon boat rentals as well as a boat launch and courtesy dock. The marina also includes a snack bar, bait shop, and fish-cleaning area. There is also a small inventory of canoes and kayaks available for rent.

Tims Ford State Park offers multiple lodging opportunities. The park has 20 beautiful cabins situated on the wooded slopes of Tims Ford Lake. The cabins are completely equipped, including appliances, cooking and serving utensils, and linens. The park has two campgrounds for tent or RV campers. In addition, tent campers may camp on any of the six islands on the lake or at our Turkey Creek area.

Another popular activity is golfing. The park is home to the Bear Trace at Tims Ford which is part of the Jack Nicklaus-designed collection. The Tims Ford Reservoir is visible from most holes on the course and comes into play on several of the 18 holes, giving the course an excellent balance of challenge and playability.

PARK TRAIL MAPS

Looking for a trail map? Click the link below to see a list of the maps available at this park. The page includes all the trail maps we have available, organized by park. We have free and paid options that provide you the details you need to have your next great adventure in Tennessee. VIEW MAPS

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