Wolf Creek Ranch Highlights Horses, History, and Hospitality in Hickman County


Lynda and Pam Hinson are sitting in lawn chairs on their front porch watching two horses graze grass on their lawn. It’s 10 a.m. in the middle of the workweek, but they look as relaxed as turtles on a log.


“We call this working,” Lynda jokes, “we’re actively mowing.”


Lynda is married to Donnie Hinson—Pam’s son—and together with their children and Pam’s husband, they manage Wolf Creek Ranch, a 100 acre horse and cattle ranch 15 miles west of downtown Centerville in Hickman County.


Get trained in horse riding


They live and work here 24/7 with most of their activities taking place in a 10-stall barn where they train and temporarily watch customers’ horses. They also host a series of rodeo competitions featuring their horse riding students in the fall in the same space.


Lynda and Donnie are Wolf Creek Ranch’s resident horse experts. Donnie graduated from farrier school and Lynda grew up going to horse camps. Before starting their own business in 2012, they worked for another horse ranch in Hohenwald, Tennessee.


Through Lynda and Donnie, students get the opportunity to learn two different styles of riding. Lynda teaches English-style riding and Donnie teaches Western-style riding.


Between 40 and 50 students practice horse riding at Wolf Creek Ranch each year.


“We are in the third generation of seeing the children graduate,” Lynda said. “We remember when they were little and…their feet would barely touch the stirrups. And now most of them have gone on; they either have horses of their own or some of them are actually doing lesson programs themselves.”



Stay overnight at a horse ranch


If you want to experience Wolf Creek Ranch without getting in the saddle, book a stay at The Corn Crib.


Built by their grandfather in 1958 for drying corn crops, the building has been renovated into a tiny home with a spacious bathroom, kitchenette, and a charming loft with a double bed. From the windows, you’ll see wildlife and farm animals ranging from horses and cows to deer and donkeys.


During your stay, you can take the Hinson’s up on horseback riding, cattle tours, a walk along their cascade waterfall trail, fishing, exploring the spring fed creek, and sending the kids out to the playground.


More primitive campsites are also available.


Walk inside an 1800s cabin


Alongside Wolf Creek, the Hinsons recently erected an 1800s hand-hewn log cabin.


Pam’s mother grew up in the cabin which was originally located about six miles away from Wolf Creek on Happy Hollow Creek. Pam was persistent in her quest to retrieve it after the state bought the land it was on and turned it into Happy Hollow Wildlife Management Area.


In its heyday, it was a 20x20 log house with an upstairs. The Hinsons have reconstructed it using the original square cut logs and dovetail logs from a smokehouse built during the same era.


History buffs will appreciate how the Hinson’s maintained the integrity of the building methods and materials used in the initial construction. Everyone will admire Pam’s story of preserving her family’s heritage.


More than just a horse and cattle ranch


There’s a lot going on at Wolf Creek Ranch, but the Hinson’s always find time to use their resources to benefit their community and serve any needs their customers may have.


School groups and scout troops regularly visit the ranch to learn more about equestrian activities or to earn badges for specific skills. Lynda loves taking a horse to area nursing homes to brighten up the residents’ day.


They have even hosted weddings in their barn, something Lynda and Donnie never imagined getting into when they started their business 10 years ago.


“That sort of trend of people wanting the barn weddings was really good because we had a lot of people that had their own horses and wanted to get married with their own horses in the pictures,” Lynda said.


Interested in Wolf Creek Ranch? Learn more about them on Facebook.


183 views1 comment